Category: Interiors

Wright presents The Four Seasons

4Seasons

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Wright Auctions presents The Four Seasons, a special auction featuring the furniture and designed tableware and objects from the iconic restaurant’s historic interior. The event will take place at The Four Seasons in New York on July 26, 2016.

Designed in 1959 by Philip Johnson for Mies van der Rohe’s landmark Seagram building on Park Avenue in Manhattan, The Four Seasons has become one of the most important and recognizable International Style interior spaces in the world. On July 16th, The Four Seasons is closing its present location in order to open in a newly designed location thus beginning a new chapter for the legendary restaurant.

While the interior space is landmarked – the famous bar, sculpture and curtains will all remain intact – the designed furniture, tableware and objects will be offered at auction in the extraordinary one day event to take place in the original interior. Featuring approximately 500 lots, the sale will include works by Mies van der Rohe and Hans Wegner as well as custom designs by Philip Johnson and special-ordered Knoll furniture. The tableware and cookware designed by L. Garth and Ada Louise Huxtable will also be offered.

Wright will publish a special catalog documenting the history of this seminal interior with additional information available online in the coming weeks.

~images via wright20.com

The Highboy Picks

 

Highboy-PicksSPONSORED POST

It was recently brought to my attention of a new online market place, The Highboy.  They have a nicely curated selection of antiques, fine art, vintage furnishings and design objects, all from trusted and reputable dealers in the industry.  

Shown above personally selected from The Highboy: Vintage Chinese Black Lacquer Console Table“Visage Brun-Bleu” by Pablo Picasso, White Earthenware Clay with Englobes Decoration, 1947, Pair of Mid-Century Art Pottery Vases by Eduardo Vega,  Pair of Murano Glass Sconces, Loewe Black Alligator Briefcase.

1st Dibs Finds

Designed in California

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Commune was established in Los Angeles in 2004 by four like-minded souls—Roman Alonso, Steven Johanknecht, Pamela Shamshiri, and Ramin Shamshiri— with a common mission: to enhance life through design and to blur the lines between disciplines, eras, and styles. California is for those who refuse to conform and who live for freedom of expression, indoor/outdoor living, and that golden sunshine glinting off the waves of the Pacific. 

Commune perfectly captures this spirit and embodies a new California style that freely mixes old and new in its layered, highly personal interiors that embrace color, pattern, and texture. This book is the first monograph of Commune’s work, featuring its designs for private residences, hotels, commercial spaces, and restaurants, as well as the works they specially commission from virtually everyone in the artisan craftsman movement in California today.~ abramsbooks.com

Check out this interview with Roman Alonso, one of the founders of Commune featured in T magazine here.

Brody House

brody 4image via c-home by Jim Bartsch

brody 2image via c-home by Jim Bartsch

brody-image via c-home by Jim Bartsch

1-matisse-ceramic-in-brody_s-courtyardLa Gerbe installed in Brody residence. Photo courtesy the archives of Frances L. Brody, now at LACMA.

Architect A. Quincy Jones’ designed the Brody House in 1949. The Brody’s,  the original owners, were well known patrons of modern art.  Jones’ modern architectural vision housed the couple’s extraordinary collection of art, including works by Picasso, Braque, Giacometti, Calder, and Moore.

When Frances L. Brody died in 2009, she gifted the 2000-pound ceramic, La Gerbe by Matisse to LACMA.   The couple had commissioned Matisse in 1952 to create  the piece and in 1954, after the artist’s death, the 15 section wall was shipped to Los Angeles and installed in what Frances L. called “the heart of our home”.

Purchased two decades ago for 24.95 million, , designer/restorer Stephen Stone has tweaked little and updated the property with modern conveniences like installing black-steel windows and adding heat and central air.   Stone also kept many of the original decorator William Haines‘ interior design ideas in the home, but mixed them with contemporary influences and pieces.

You can view the original article posted in C Home here.

Remodelista Book

remodelistaI just ordered this and looking forward to receiving Julie Carlson’s, editor of Remodelista design blog, first book :  Remodelista: A Manual for the Considered Home .  

Remodelista.com is the go-to, undisputed authority for home design enthusiasts, remodelers, architects, and designers. Unlike sites that cater to all tastes, Remodelista has a singular and clearly defined aesthetic: classic pieces trump designs that are trendy and transient, and well-edited spaces take precedence over cluttered environments. High and low mix seamlessly here, and getting the look need not be expensive (think Design Within Reach meets Ikea). Remodelista decodes the secrets to achieving this aesthetic, with in-depth tours and lessons from 12 enviable homes; a recipe-like breakdown of the hardest-working kitchens and baths; dozens of do-it-yourself projects; “The Remodelista 100,” a guide to the best everyday household objects; and an in-depth look at the ins and outs of the remodeling process. In a world of design confusion, Remodelista takes the guesswork out of the process.~via amazon

I ordered mine here.

 

Aesop Design

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I’m quite taken with the design of the Aesop Signatur-Store, Berlin spotted in Architectural Digest – German Edition.  The green scape of tiles used make a stunning abstract backdrop to the simple dark bottles of the Australian skincare brand.

Each Aesop store interior from Melbourne, New York, Paris, Hong Kong and beyond are designed by architects around the world keeping each design different from the other…no two are the same.  Dennis Paphitis, Aesop founder explains why in an exclusive interview in DezeenIt wasn’t so hard to respectfully consider each space individually, consider the customer, the context and to bring a little joy into the conversation.”

In Taipei “we needed to work with a local Taiwanese architect on the first store there. And that just got me thinking about the kind of assault on the streetscape that retailers inflict through the ordinary course of mindless business, the idea that one size would so often be forced to fit all. It wasn’t so hard to respectfully consider each space individually, consider the customer, the context and to bring a little joy into the conversation….Architecturally our criteria is always to try and work with what is already there and to weave ourselves into the core and fabric of the street, rather than to impose what we were doing…

I’m personally more comfortable with under-designed looking design, if that makes sense, or design that dissolves and recedes rather than screams ‘look how clever I am’.” ~Dezeen 

Please visit Dezeen  for a look at other Aesop store designs from around the world and to read the whole interview.

~images via AD

Axel Vervoordt : : Living with Light

Axel Vervoordt

 Belgian designer/art dealer Axel Vervoordt and his design company whose bespoke interiors impeccably blend antiques and contemporary art have a new book. Axel Vervoordt : : Living with Light explores the Vervoordt design principles and philosophy of living in harmony with natural elements – light, as well as water, metal, wood – and blending the power and influence of nature with the inspiration of art.

“Light is law. It is power, force and life. Light is an energy that helps create the world and define our experiences.” – Axel Vervoordt

Axel Vervoordt : : Living with Light will be out in October , but available here for pre-order.